Musica Universalis

Musica universalis is the whole universe in a state of harmony called the Cosmos like an inaudible beautiful melody derived from a combination of proportions of sweet sounds from different musical instruments.

The sounds from different instruments are different voices, and musica universalis is one voice - the voice of Almighty God.

"And I heard a loud voice, that sounded like a trumpet" (Revelation 1:10) "GNT"

The sound, though loud, is inaudible because musica universalis depicts the whole universe in a state of overall resonance derived from proportions of resonance of astronomical bodies such as moons, planets, stars and asteroids.

An example of a musical instrument whose sweet sound is a proportion of the universal music is the planet Jupiter. Orbital resonance between Jupiter's Galilean moons Lo, Europa and Ganymede are proportions of the overall resonance generated by Jupiter.

The Solar System is a musical instrument whose sweet sound is the sum of proportions of sounds coming from the planets and their moons.  The great conjunction between Saturn and Jupiter is a proportion of the overall sound coming from the solar system.

Conjunctions between stars, black holes, solar systems and asteroids are points of reconciliation and unity represented by dots.

Every dot in the tree of life, the Tetractys or the octet is a point of conjunction between two astronomical bodies, which means that the sefirot are points of harmony between stars, planets, moons, asteroids, black holes, solar systems and galaxies.

Musica universalis is the Axis Mundi whose sweet sound is the beauty of the Cosmos. Beauty is equal to Tiferet, and Tiferet (the seventh sefirah) is numerically equal 6. This means that Tiferet has two numbers attached to it: 6 and 7.

6 means hexagon - a six-sided polygon, seven means seven dots or seven points.

The six dots are the six vertices of a hexagon (representing the six days of creation) and 7 is the seventh dot in the centre of the hexagon (representing the seventh day of creation).

"Then the seven angels with the seven trumpets prepared to blow them." (Revelation 8:6) "GNT"

The six dots are the first six trumpets announcing the six steps of destruction of the chaotic old world (the destruction of the old Jerusalem).

And the seventh dot is the seventh trumpet announcing the creation of a new world (the new Jerusalem).

''Then the seventh angel blew his trumpet, and there were loud voices in heaven, saying, "The power to rule over the world belongs now to our Lord and his Messiah, and he will rule for ever and ever!"' (Revelation 11:15) "GNT"

This means that the six vertices of the hexagon are six angels and the seventh dot is the seventh angel.

The hexagon is a choir of angels, and the seventh dot is the Choir Master.

"To the Chief Musician. With my stringed instruments." (Habbakuk 3:19) "NKJV"

Therefore the sounds of the trumpet are sounds of angels in heaven singing the melody of musica universalis.

Every point of conjunction is an angel and the two astronomical bodies are the two wings of an angel.

Apart from the three points on the three vertices of the Tetractys, the other seven points constitute the hexagon. The seventh point or dot is equal to 4, and 4 is equal to YHWH.

Therefore the sound of the seventh trumpet is Yahweh.

The angels in heaven are singing Yahweh! All the stars in the sky are singing Yahweh! Every planet, galaxy, solar system, black hole, and every astronomical body is singing Yahweh! The sweet sound of Yahweh is the universal music.

Every ten conjunctions are equal to a Tetractys of the Decad, and in every triangle is a hexagon representing resonance. Consequently, the Axis Mundi (the Cosmos) is made up of repeating units of hexagons that are the sound of musica universalis.

Note that the Tetractys and the hexagon are geometric shapes and the points or dots are numbers. Also note how the Tetractys is confirmed by the Bible. This means that musica universalis is geometrical, numerical and theological.

Musica universalis is the beauty of the Cosmos, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope.

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